01IAPT

THE INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF PHOTOGRAPHY AND THEORY (IAPT) ) is a non-profit, academic-oriented organization dedicated to the multidisciplinary and critical study of photography and photographic practices. The Association engages with a diverse community of artists, scholars, researchers and students, who share a common interest in photography. Representing a wide spectrum of disciplines, including photography, contemporary art, visual sociology, anthropology, art history, curatorial studies, filmmaking and education, the Association provides a creative platform for its members to explore the photographic image and photography’s artistic, political, social, and historical manifestation.

IAPT organizes the biannual International Conference of Photography and Theory (ICPT) in Cyprus, a conference that aims to bring together researchers and practitioners from diverse fields of study related to photography. The ICPT conference was initiated as a response to an expanding interest in historical, artistic, cultural and scholarly research on photography, and has since been established as one of the leading international academic conferences on photography. Visit our conference page to find out more about the next ICPT conference theme and location.

ICPT 2018

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02ICPT2018

5th International Conference of Photography & Theory

Photographies and Conflict: Archiving and Consuming Images of Strife

November 22-24, 2018

Nicosia, Cyprus


Keynote Speakers

Akram Zaatari • Filmmaker, photographer, archival artist, curator and co-founder of the Arab Image Foundation.
Dr. Anthony Downey • Professor of Visual Culture in North Africa and the Middle East, at Birmingham City University, and editor for the Contemporary Visual Culture in the Middle East series.
Dr. Olga Demetriou • PRIO Cyprus Centre (Peace Research Institute Oslo) and Department of Social and Political Science, University of Cyprus.


CALL FOR PAPERS

As drones fly over our heads surveying our movements, it becomes evident that the fast evolving technologies of capturing images of war and violence have resulted, among other things, in an unprecedented extent of spectacles of conflict. Anaesthetized and disconcerted because of our repeated encounter with the visual representation of the ever increasing instances of strife, the potential democratic role of photographic images in addressing how we understand notions of pluralism, control, manipulation, terror and erasure gains precedence as we realize our numbness due to over-exposure. Propaganda, resistance and activism are re-narrated through a post- and yet neo-colonial frame of political intervention, control and detention by world powers, while the presence of photographic images of conflict has become firmly relocated, placed within contemporary art practice and the museum space. At the same time, due to the proliferating technologies of production, the multiplicity of photographic practices, genres, uses and migrations of photographs, we are compelled to start thinking about photographic endeavours in terms of a multitude of photographies instead of the singularity of photography.

As drones fly over our heads surveying our movements, it becomes evident that the fast evolving technologies of capturing images of war and violence have resulted, among other things, in an unprecedented extent of spectacles of conflict.

The advancements of technologies enable the gathering, collecting and storing of more and more images, allowing us to explore the conflictual dynamics of collections and of the ways in which archives are shaped.  Far from being interpreted merely as places of collection and order, archives have emphatically emerged as sites of social, historical, theoretical, artistic and political debate. Attempts to unravel the regenerative – sometimes even radical – potentials of state-ordained and institutional archiving practices reveal the disputed narratives of photographic archives and their role in chronicling conflict, materiality and dissonance.  Oscillating between what we do or do not allow to be included, and moving between the rigidness and fluidity with which we construct our rhetorics of visibility and invisibility, photographic archives emerge as contested territories. 


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